tutorials

modified Icelandic BO

Recently, I needed to find a Bind Off which could match German Twisted Cast On. I love using this method for border in ribbing because it’s easy to do – it’s a variation of long-tail CO which is most familiar to me -, and it gives a reversible and sturdy edge perfect for hard-wearing items (if you don’t know this technique, see this link). But the strength of this CO is, above all, its elasticity.
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making-of

Spring Thaw Tam

Just after designing my Spring Thaw Mitts, I wanted to have matching items and began to knit a little tam.
As you probably know, Broken seed stitch my mitts feature is characterized by an alternation of knit-purl rows and purl-knit rows like the classical Seed stitch. For my mitts, I’d found a solution for increases that doesn’t disturb this pattern, but with a tam, I had to rack my brains this time for crown decreases!
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tutorials

Japanese W&T

As promised at the end of the last post, here’s a tutorial of a new? short rows technique – a mix of W&T and Japanese method.

On RS (from RS to WS), as with W&T method, you knit to the turn-back point, slip one stitch, and bring your working yarn in front. I usually replace wrapped sts onto LN before turning work, it’s more secure.
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tutorials

Japanese short rows?

You’ve perhaps heard of “the Japanese Short Rows method” which only uses a slipped st at each turn. This technique only requires split markers (or safety pins, paper clips…) you put on your working yarn to mark the connecting loop. And when you get back to the marked stitches, you will lift the loop to resolve the gaps.
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