tutorials

Italian Tubular Cast-on 2

Last time, you have cast on the required number of stitches on your needle with the Italian tubular method. Then what happens next?

After strictly speaking casting-on, you need to work two set-up rows, called often tubular rows.
There are three major cases. The first two are for projects worked back and forth and the last one concerns those worked in the round.
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tutorials

Italian Tubular Cast-on 1

If you are a keen observer, you may have noticed that the ribbing edges of store-bought garments are different from your handknit sweaters’. Indeed, you can know whether a garment was hand-knit or not, just by seeing the ribbing edges!
The tubular cast-on and its bind-off counterpart produce that ribbing edge of store-bought garments and give your handknits a neat, professional look. If it amuses you to pretend as if your handknits are not hand-knit, this cast-on is for you 😁
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tech-editing & tutorials

Right and Left in Knitting

This is the first article about technical editing but the subject concerns not only knitting designers, but all knitters! I drew schematics to be clear, so I hope this will help you in your futur projects 🙂

Do you know your right and left? This is THE start point – coz my hubby doesn’t know very well! (He asks me “the right this side (pointing right) or the right this side (pointing left)?” 😑)
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tutorials

German short rows

German short rows technique began to be used around 2013 in English knitting patterns, and has become so much popular that most patterns using Stockinette stitch and published recently use this technique.

The number one reason of this popularity is its simplicity. Unlike wrap and turn which seems to require some steps to turn and to resolve the gap, German short rows’ operations look simpler. Let’s see if it is true with pictures.
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tutorials

KRL and KLL

When I began to knit patterns written in English, I was surprised that M1L and M1R increases were used very frequently, because the increases generally used in Japan are KRL and KLL. They are very easy to do, neat, and useful!
There are also their purled versions, PRL and PLL that I’d like to present you, because there is no tutorial on them on the internet, and they’re I think much easier than M1Lp and M1Rp! But I’m going to show you KRL and KLL first to show you the principle.
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