tutorials

German short rows

German short rows technique began to be used around 2013 in English knitting patterns, and has become so much popular that most patterns using Stockinette stitch and published recently use this technique.

The number one reason of this popularity is its simplicity. Unlike wrap and turn which seems to require some steps to turn and to resolve the gap, German short rows’ operations look simpler. Let’s see if it is true with pictures.
Continue reading

tutorials

KRL and KLL

When I began to knit patterns written in English, I was surprised that M1L and M1R increases were used very frequently, because the increases generally used in Japan are KRL and KLL. They are very easy to do, neat, and useful!
There are also their purled versions, PRL and PLL that I’d like to present you, because there is no tutorial on them on the internet, and they’re I think much easier than M1Lp and M1Rp! But I’m going to show you KRL and KLL first to show you the principle.
Continue reading

tutorials

modified Icelandic BO

Recently, I needed to find a bind-off which could match German Twisted Cast On. I love using this CO for borders in ribbing because it’s easy to do – it’s a variation of a long-tail CO, which is most familiar to me -, and it gives a reversible and sturdy edge perfect for hard-wearing items (if you don’t know this technique, see this link). But the strength of this CO is, above all, its elasticity.
Continue reading

tutorials

Japanese W&T

As promised at the end of the last post, here’s a tutorial of a new? short-row technique – a mix of W&T and Japanese method.

On RS (from RS to WS), as with W&T method, you knit to the turn-back point, slip one stitch, and bring your working yarn in front. I usually replace wrapped sts onto LN before turning work, this is more secure.
Continue reading