tutorials

Italian Tubular Cast-on 2

Last time, you have cast on the required number of stitches on your needle with the Italian tubular method. Then what happens next?

After strictly speaking casting-on, you need to work two set-up rows, called often tubular rows.
There are three major cases. The first two are for projects worked back and forth and the last one concerns those worked in the round.
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tutorials

Italian Tubular Cast-on 1

If you are a keen observer, you may have noticed that the ribbing edges of store-bought garments are different from your handknit sweaters’. Indeed, you can know whether a garment was hand-knit or not, just by seeing the ribbing edges!
The tubular cast-on and its bind-off counterpart produce that ribbing edge of store-bought garments and give your handknits a neat, professional look. If it amuses you to pretend as if your handknits are not hand-knit, this cast-on is for you 😁
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tutorials

modified Icelandic BO

Recently, I needed to find a bind-off which could match German Twisted Cast On. I love using this CO for borders in ribbing because it’s easy to do – it’s a variation of a long-tail CO, which is most familiar to me -, and it gives a reversible and sturdy edge perfect for hard-wearing items (if you don’t know this technique, see this link). But the strength of this CO is, above all, its elasticity.
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