making-of

Reverse stockinette stripes study

I’m fond of stripes. Most of my wardrobe consists of striped t-shirts and pullovers and I’ve knitted lots of striped garments so far.
When I was planning to make a gift cardigan for the baby of friends of ours, I naturally wanted it striped, but to give a twist to the design, I decided to use Reverse stockinette st.

First of all, I knitted a swatch trying different types of stripes with the colors I bought for this project (Malabrigo, SOCK: Natural & Ochre).
reverse-stripe-study (3)-small
Can you guess how I knitted (or purled)?

The answer is ta-da! I put the purled side photo side by side so that we can easily compare them.
reverse-stripe-study (4)-small reverse-stripe-study (3)-small
Don’t you think the impression of RS (purled side!) is quite different from the WS’s? This is because in Reverse Sockinette st, you have a “transitional row” at each color change where two colors – the head of the old color and the bottom of the new color – are mixed up. And that make these stripes softer.

In fact, I was absolutely not satisfied with the color combination, and replaced the ochre yarn with a mustard one (Cascade Yarns, HERITAGE: #5652 mustard).
reverse-stripe-study (1)-small
With this color combo, Mustard is much stronger and brighter than ochre – and much more yellow than the color of French moutard de Dijon! – , and the contrast with white is pronounced. That’s why I reduced the number of mustard rows on my way, whereas with the first ochre-white combo, you should knit more ochre rows to get the same impression.

The knitted side (= WS!) looks like that.
reverse-stripe-study (1)-small reverse-stripe-study (2)-small

I tried another color combination with my stash yarn (BC Garn, SEMILLA FINO: ox101 & ox102).
reverse-stripe-study (5)-small
I think it would be harder to guess how the stripes were worked: The wider stripes on the lower side that looks like 1 row are indeed knit with 2 rows, and each series of thin 2 lines on the upper side consists of just 1 row.
reverse-stripe-study (6)-small reverse-stripe-study (5)-small

I think we can draw a kind of conclusion: the more different and contrasting are the colors in terms of hue, intensity and tone, the less you would use the stronger one – unless of course you aim for the opposite effect.

Finally, I chose 2-row stripes with white-mustard combination to make the cardigan prototype – yes, much fuss for a very banal result! But it’s worth your while testing different stripes sequences.

And here are the finished cardigans.
Alexandre#1&#3-small
I’m going to look for test knitters soon. Stay tuned!

P.S. This cardigan is currently test knitted here.

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